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20121120
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refused to consider higher tax rates. timing is also a sticking point here. here is john boehner this weekend. >> 2013 should be the year to begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. together we should avert the fiscal cliff in a manner that ensures 2013 finally is that year. >> no accident, by the way, it was boehner who did the republican response to the president this weekend. the president holds the most leverage in the next two months, directly after the election and before tax rates expire. when the threat of a tax increase on the middle class hangs over the negotiations. republicans would like to try out the negotiations to see the political climate is better for them in the next congress. the big question is how much did the white house learn from the failed debt talk to 2011? will the president bypass leader ship and begin to try to deal directly with the republican senators who have sounded the most open to compromise. >> i think there is a deal. the ying and yang of this is we know there have to be revenues. look, i haven't met a wealthy republ
, that $1.6 trillion, is twice the amount of revenue that he and boehner put on the table last summer. it's a clear sign to the left that the president has stopped beginning his negotiations from the middle ground, something democrats have often complained about with this president. afl-cio president said he's confident that the president is not going to fold. >> the president led with that notion of protecting the middle class. are we going to collectively stand up and make sure that workers get a fair shake in all of this? absolutely we are. do we believe that the president is committed to that same thing? absolutely we do. will the president show today he's willing to go over the fiscal cliff if reboundians don't make the deal they are satisfied with. in a new pew poll, 50% will not reach an agreement in time. 53% are assuming republicans will be more to blame if no deal is struck. but yesterday minority leader mitch mcconnell, who met with the three gop freshmen, new senators, will join the repub c republican conference, struck a hard line when it came to tax rates. >> in politics th
boehner said they would continue to staunchly oppose tax rate increases, but on sunday. bill kristolly to republican house members it's not just them versus the president, it's them versus history. >> i think republicans will have to give in much more than they think. four presidents in the last election vo won 50% of the vote twice. roosevelt, eisenhower, reagan, and obama. republicans in the house will be able to get some concessions, but i think there will be a big budget deal next year, and it will be much moran obama budget deal than paul ryan budget deal. elections have consequences. karen capehart, did you expect anything this big this fast? bill kristol is influential with republicans in washington. i'm stunned with what i'm hearing? >> i almost fell out of my chair when boehner said revenues. the idea of increasing revenues. that's a central argument that we have been having over the last four years, and the very expensive i told you so i guess. if we're going to get to this problem, we have to deal with revenues, we can't just do it all on the spending side. >> jonathan capeh
point -- that speaker boehner showed yesterday in his remarks. he basically said that the president won the election, and he should lead. he basically, he said that he was open to revenues. which is, which many in his own party disagree with. um, so i thought the tone was the right thing. now, you know, you can't expect the speaker to turn on a dime in 24 hours and embrace everything; higher taxes, higher taxes on the wealthy. but i think that privately he's seen the handwriting on the wall, and it makes me very hopeful that we can do something big in the next month and a half. it's a good first step. um, i would say two things, though, in relation to it. when you unpack the speaker's speech, there is a premise that doesn't quite work, and we're going to have to help him move others in the republican party away from it. it's called -- part of his speech he talked about dynamic scoring. this idea that if you cut taxes, you will increase revenues. well, it's about time we debunked that myth. it's a rumpelstiltskin fairy tale, dynamic scoring. if you may remember, rumpelstiltskin was the f
. day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11: 50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois, mr. quigley, for five minutes. mr. quigley: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, an estimated 50,000 people die every year as a result of seize years. some of -- seizures. some of these victims are like danny stanton. chicago's mike and mary stanton founded the danny foundation after their 4-year-old son, danny, died from a seizure while he was sleeping. it is dedicated to preventing deaths caused by seizures and raising epilepsy awareness among the public and medical community. that's no small task, but one
party should take president obama up on his offer. you have speaker boehner saying, let's get compromise. this is the time to bring that debt down. we seriously have to do it. i don't think anyone disputes that, but it has to be a mix of spending cuts and the revenue. and the one figure that i'd like to add here is how much revenue we get by just going back to the clinton levels at $250,000 and above. that's $700 billion in tenures. that's what draws people to that number when you add that in and then close some loopholes and subsidies and do the budget cuts, we have already done a trillion. you can get to the $4 trillion that most economists say would at least lead us to the path to reduce debt over ten years. >> because it is so much money and because it would be so relatively painless for people who have income above $250,000 to see that change go back, because bill crystal is saying this now, because the president is clear that's what he's running on, it feels that's clear that's within the realm of the possible. but what else didn't previously peel like it was in the realm of possib
john boehner, have shifted in recent days, and they are talking more about their openness, much more so than they were before the election. they are saying that they are open to revenue, but only in the formal closing loopholes, not raising rates. host: the front page of "politico," you can check that out. stephen sloan, what is the likelihood that both sides agreed to a short-term deal or a long-term deal in the last 50 days of the lame-duck session? host: -- caller: people want a deal, but the question is if both sides can take the pain that it will take to get to the deal. i am not sure that either side is willing to take that kind of pain. you could still go over the cliff. host: anything else on the agenda this week, as negotiations kickoff? caller: tomorrow night this will be the first time that lawmakers are on capitol hill since september. basically, lawmakers will be talking amongst themselves about negotiations with the white house. host: stephen sloan, thank you so much for joining us this morning. caller: thank you. host: we're going now to tom, from columbus, ohio. we're di
boehner says under the right conditions might be able to bargain. what are those? guest: i am cautiously optimistic that we will find some solution in a time. i think it would be irresponsible, a big it would be responsible for the president or either party to voluntarily drive off of the cliff. i think the key is that we want a smart balance to get the economy going, generate more revenue, as well as smart spending cuts. we really think those are conditions that actually get the economy going. and ensure our investors that we are serious about getting our financial house in order. i think working with the tax code is critical. i do not how -- see how we do this without during the fundamental tax reform. it the economy over the past three years had just been an average recovery, back where we were in 2009, our deficit would be cut in half this year. that goes a long way toward a balanced budget, with this we would get there, and fundamental tax reform is key to getting all of that capital off the sidelines, back to create the jobs we need pirouetting fundamental tax reform along with the
to every debail of his plan. house speaker, john boehner, wants to keep all the bush tax cuts in place. he's starting to talk about closing up tax loopholes. conservative pundit and weekly standard editor bill kristol said it's time for republicans to come so some sort of compromise. >> conservative movement has to pull back, let people float new ideas, let's have a serious debate. don't scream and yell when one person says it won't kill the country if we raise taxes a little bit on millionaires. it really won't, i don't think. i don't understand why republicans don't take obama's offer? >> cnn's senior congressional correspondent dana bash is live for us in washington, d.c. what do you make of his comments? >> soledad, look, bill kristol is not an elected official. he doesn't get a vote. but he is a very influential gop voice here in washington. and around the country. and for him to tell republicans it wouldn't kill to them to agree to tax increases for millionaires. it's a big deal. and we heard some similar talk from republicans who do have a vote like senator bob corker. listen to thi
to make john boehner's life easier. you know, if ever--you know, you keep seeing this clip of george bush talking about all the political capital he has gained, right? this is the second electoral landslides. >> caller: the first thing that george bush did with that political capital was to privatize social security. that was the beginning of the end. that's when his second term got broken along before all the bad stuff happened. >> stephanie: you talk about this a lot, too, what happens on the sunday shows. >> caller: i took this week off by the way. >> stephanie: i don't know if you saw this, but this is what drives you and i crazy not just about the democratic party but mainstream media. this is the question that was asked of schumer. >> would you like to see the president bring him in for the negotiations over the fiscal cliff. >> caller: shoot me now. >> stephanie: really? >> caller: why? >> stephanie: really the guy that just lost by a landslide. >> caller: first of all, if you were hiring the guy why would you hire the guy? why would you bring aboard the guy whose economic plan was
. john boehner still in the house for the time being at the treasury. the president is back in the white house and harry reid is in the senate with a few more seats. why should i believe this would end any more positively than the summer of 2011? >> because again i'm not going to try to talk to you in optimism but let's look at what's changed. you have republican leadership acknowledging for the first time in this debate in public that it's agreed to increase in revenues as part of an agreement that helps restore fiscal balance. that's a very important change. you can debate on what motivated that change, and of course it's true that approach has been a popular very substantial support among the american people. you have a much greater recognition that the economy would benefit on a carefully designed balanced agreement on fiscal reform and putting it off indefinitely is not good for the country. that's important, too. and i also think again if you listen carefully to what people are saying and what many politicians are saying with many elected representatives are saying there's a lot of
. >> time to get the job done. >> speaker boehner told republican members they would have to avoid nasty fights and according to "the new york times" they seemed to listen. the word don't change a basic disagreement that could push the country off the fiscal cliff, the first of january. when a number of tax cuts expire, meaning the average family will pay $3,700 a year. and severe cuts to defense and government spending will be triggered. the sticking point on avoiding the cliff, taxes. the president campaigned on and won, on letting tax cuts for the rich expire. a leading republican said no. >> no republican will vote for higher tax rates. we will generate revenue from eliminating deductions and loopholes. >> reporter: if that sound like the argument we heard. you are right. democrats appear emboldened that rates for the rich rise. are we headed for the cliff? >> if the republicans will not agree with that, we will reach a pin the at the end of this year, where all of the tax cuts expire, and we'll start over next year. >> reporter: friday, congressional leaders come here to the was to
boehner actually said it well. he said the mandate from the election of last week is for us to find a way to work together on solutions to the challenges we face as a nation. i can't agree more. elections have consequences and our ability to avert the fiscal cliff in which expiring tax cuts and across the board spending cuts are on the course to derail this economy requires us to respect that directive from voters. yet once again, lines are being drawn. you just heard it. over what types of revenue will be considered or what cuts are considered too steep. i hope was not the only one astounded by the comments of the c.e.o. of the american petroleum institute who recently said, quote, the oil and gas industry will not be singled out for punitive repeat, unquote. how fascinating. perhaps i could introduce him to the federal work force, our federal employees who are so far the only group to be singled out for punitive treatment to the tune of $75 billion of deficit reduction. they understand the principle of shared sacrifice and have patiently been waiting for everybody else to actually share
says he wants to see higher tax rates. john vitter says axel in not. >> -- john boehner says clearly not. >> it is a lot easier to say at this level of generality. it becomes harder to enacted. the number of times of with the head of the cbo, senator so and so would call me up and say i want to talk about tax reform and i would walk in and the head is one talking point which is brought in the base and lower the rate. what are you willing to scale back? mortgage interest, cannot touch that. charitable, cannot touch that. you go down the list. one of the reasons of these new ideas being attractive is a are obscuring what has to be cut back. >> there is still a hard choice there. >> we are not saying we are going to cut out your ability to deduct your mortgage but i will get to keep my ability to deduct my local tax. everything goes into a pot. everybody gets to keep their deductions but you cannot be too greedy about it. it does have to limit the amount they can benefit from it. >> that is the selling point. >> the notion here, can you do this and have the only effect of the wealthiest
week. host: "the baltimore sun" has a story, "boehner ways next moves." this is from "the wall street journal." "post office hint of gop path." host: "she fit a profile." so, more on leadership, which both sides will be voting for this week when they return to washington on who will be their leaders. so, we will continue to watch that story for u.s. well. part of the mix to avoid the fiscal cliff is these jobless benefits. that is the headline in the politics and policy section of "the washington post." "over 2 million americans could lose their jobless benefits before the end of the year." host: susan, michigan, what do you think? should we cut medicare and social security? caller: absolutely not. absolutely not. host: why not? caller: i am a woman who has finally reached the age of social security. all the years the work, this money was taken out of my paycheck. i was told from a very young age that when i reached a fine age of the period where you retire and you can get social security, that all the money that i paid in would be refunded to me. this money is not to be touched, not
for governor romney, i worked for john boehner. i called up our didge cal -- digital guy and said tell me about twitter and he said you don't need to know that. that is not going to take off. so much of what we did was driven from the bottom up through twitter. even when toivens plane, we would go -- even when i was on the plane, jen was on a much bigger plane called air force 1. i was on hairforce 1. by the time i came back to the front of the plane i would see on twitter i already made news. >> when you say people, you don't mean people. you mean reporters. >> or people. [laughter] >>that was on the -- free to be you and me c.d. reporters are people. but this was kind of backstage conversation you were watching play out on twitter. sometimes real people. it was more important for you how the journalists were using twitter. >> it became an incredible newsing a gator. you could see now like t.p.m. more left leaning. see what they are saying. see what folks on the right are saying. folks in the middle are supposed to be saying. what the outside groups are saying and you sort of got a good snapsh
to study in the congress. >> deirdre walton, cnn, since the elections john boehner has been talking about what to negotiate a deal on the fiscal cliff and says he is open to new revenue and willingness to compromise. i was wondering what you think of his position on this, and if you are right to support him this afternoon? >> i do not know if you are here earlier when i spoke about the 10-1 deal. i want to see where they are willing to cut. olive heard is that the democrats are saying they are not willing to cut anything in. the president had a meeting last night with the labor unions, all of these separate liberal groups. and everyone of those groups to the president that he should not deliver anything on a reforms of our entitlement system, but you should insure the delivers a tax increase. i do not think they are open- minded in any way. i think we need to stop negotiating with ourselves. and we need to wait for the democrats to actually give us an offer that is a real serious offer. we need to stop speaking amongst ourselves. he won the presidency, let him lead. >> i believe that reve
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)